Banner Photograph
Davis Dairy, Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee on Wildwood.
Taken by Judith Richards Shubert, September 28, 2005, Copyright

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Fellow Bloggers are Fantastic!


What a beautiful award! I am so honored to have been given this new Kreativ Blogger award by Diana, the creator and author of Random Relatives. Thanks, Diana.

The winner of this award is supposed to list seven things about themselves and then pass the award along to seven other bloggers. There are so many wonderful bloggers out there who deserve this award, and I enjoy reading them all. I have learned more about genealogy through my association with the friends I've met through blogging than anywhere else. I would love to recognize them all! Let me start with 7 ~

Roots Digging
Deb's Genealogy Room
The Graveyard Rabbit Afield
100 Years in America
Nordic Blue
My Family Roots Run Deep
A Couple of Bubbles Off Center

Now for those 7 things about me ~ hmmm ~
1. Working on new project. As newly appointed historian for the Mineral Wells High School 50 Year Club, my alma mater, I'm preserving memorabilia that has been donated to the club.
2. My mother was a twin and my step-father was a twin. Just KNEW I'd have twins, but didn't.
3. Struggling with recurrent cornea erosion for the last year.
4. Lived in Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Alabama after getting married. Then finally back to Texas where we met!
5. Love to read history books ~ read for an hour every night, no matter what time I go to bed, and at least that long while I'm drinking coffee every morning.
6. Live on a cul-de-sac and can see our pick-up on Google Earth!
7. Always wanted to learn to fly. Do ya think at 66 I've waited too late?

Thanks again, Diana!

Monday, November 16, 2009

Memorial Day 2005 - Stones River National Battlefield



Stones River National Battlefield
In the cold, early morning of the last day of 1862, a battle erupted between two American armies totaling more than 80,000 men. The small town of Murfeeesboro, Tennessee was about to become a major battlefield.
The Battle of Stones River was one of the bloodiest of the war. More than 3,000 men lay dead on the field. Nearly 16,000 more were wounded. Some of these men spent as much as seven agonizing days on the battlefield before help could reach them. The two armies sustained nearly 24,000 casualties, which was almost one-third of the 81,000 men engaged.
Today, more than 6,100 Union soldiers are buried in Stones River National Cemetery. Of these, 2,562 are unknown. Nearly 1,000 veterans, and some family members, who served in the century since the Civil War are also interred there.

About 2,000 Confederates are buried in the Confederate Circle at Evergreen Cemetery. This plot is their third resting place. They were buried on the battlefield by Union soldiers after the battle, and were moved to their own cemetery later. When the first Confederate cemetery fell into disrepair in 1867, the bodies were moved to Evergreen Cemetery.

On Memorial Day, 2005, some of my family members visited the Stones River Battlefield where we listened to a Park Ranger tell of the battle that raged on that site more than one hundred years earlier. My grandsons, young as they were, listened with awe and asked questions of us as we walked through the cemetery later. They remembered the ranger telling about the German soldier named Christian Nix that fell on the first day of battle. Stones River National Battlefield’s museum and archives collections hold many artifacts and documents detailing the life of Lieutenant Christian Nix of the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Infantry. The boys were anxious to look for his tombstone. A carved wooden board once marked his original burial place and a marker of stone now displays his name and company. That Labor Day there were flags marking all of the graves.


Tombstone of Lieutenant Christian Nix
24th Wisconsin Infantry






 

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Photographs:
  • Stones River National Battlefield and Cemetery, Digital Format, Original photographs taken and belonging to Judith Richards Shubert, Labor Day, 2006.
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